FLOSS Foundations

May 22, 2015

Dries Buytaert

Why WooMattic is big news for small businesses

Earlier this week Matt Mullenweg, founder and CEO of Automattic, parent company of WordPress.com, announced the acquisition of WooCommerce. This is a very interesting move that I think cements the SMB/enterprise positioning between WordPress and Drupal.

As Matt points out a huge percentage of the digital experiences on the web are now powered by open source solutions: WordPress, Joomla and Drupal. Yet one question the acquisition may evoke is: "How will open source platforms drive ecommerce innovation in the future?".

Larger retailers with complex requirements usually rely on bespoke commerce engines or built their online stores on solutions such as Demandware, Hybris and Magento. Small businesses access essential functions such as secure transaction processing, product information management, shipping and tax calculations, and PCI compliance from third-party solutions such as Shopify, Amazon's merchant services and increasingly, solutions from Squarespace and Wix.

I believe the WooCommerce acquisition by Automattic puts WordPress in a better position to compete against the slickly marketed offerings from Squarespace and Wix, and defend WordPress's popular position among small businesses. WooCommerce brings to WordPress a commerce toolkit with essential functions such as payments processing, inventory management, cart checkout and tax calculations.

Drupal has a rich library of commerce solutions ranging from Drupal Commerce -- a library of modules offered by Commerce Guys -- to connectors offered by Acquia for Demandware and other ecommerce engines. Brands such as LUSH Cosmetics handle all of their ecommerce operations with Drupal, others, such as Puma, use a Drupal-Demandware integration to combine the best elements of content and commerce to deliver stunning shopping experiences that break down the old division between brand marketing experiences and the shopping process. Companies such as Tesla Motors have created their own custom commerce engine and rely on Drupal to deliver the front-end customer experience across multiple digital channels from traditional websites to mobile devices, in-store kiosks and more.

To me, this further accentuates the division of the CMS market with WordPress dominating the small business segment and Drupal further solidifying its position with larger organizations with more complex requirements. I'm looking forward to seeing what the next few years will bring for the open source commerce world, and I'd love to hear your opinion in the comments.

by Dries at May 22, 2015 03:38 AM

May 20, 2015

Weekly Squeak

DLS copy

pittsburgDLS copy

http://www.dynamic-languages-symposium.org/

—————————–

C A L L   F O R   P A P E R S

—————————–

======== DLS 2015 ===========

11th Dynamic Languages Symposium 2015

October, 2015

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

http://DLS2015.inria.fr

Co-located with SPLASH 2015

In association with ACM SIGPLAN

The 11th Dynamic Languages Symposium (DLS) at SPLASH 2015 is the premier forum for researchers and practitioners to share knowledge and research on dynamic languages, their implementation, and applications. The influence of dynamic languages — from Lisp to Smalltalk to Python to Javascript — on real-world practice and research continues to grow.

DLS 2015 invites high quality papers reporting original research, innovative contributions, or experience related to dynamic languages, their implementation, and applications. Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library, and freely available for 2 weeks before and after the event itself.  Areas of interest include but are not limited to:

Innovative language features and implementation techniques

Development and platform support, tools

Interesting applications

Domain-oriented programming

Very late binding, dynamic composition, and run-time adaptation

Reflection and meta-programming

Software evolution

Language symbiosis and multi-paradigm languages

Dynamic optimization

Hardware support

Experience reports and case studies

Educational approaches and perspectives

Semantics of dynamic languages

== Invited Speaker ==

DLS is pleased to announce a talk by the following invited speaker:

Eelco Visser: Declare your Language.

== Submissions and proceedings ==

Submissions should not have been published previously nor under review at other events. Research papers should describe work that advances the current state of the art. Experience papers should be of broad interest and should describe insights gained from substantive practical applications. The program committee will evaluate each contributed paper based on its relevance, significance, clarity, length, and originality.

Papers are to be submitted electronically at

http://www.easychair.org/conferences?conf=dls15 in PDF format. Submissions must be in the ACM format (see

http://www.sigplan.org/authorInformation.htm) and not exceed 12 pages. Authors are reminded that brevity is a virtue.

DLS 2015 will run a two-phase reviewing process to help authors make their final papers the best that they can be. After the first round of reviews, papers will be rejected, conditionally accepted, or unconditionally accepted. Conditionally accepted papers will be given a list of issues raised by reviewers. Authors will then submit a revised version of the paper with a cover letter explaining how they have or why they have not addressed these issues. The reviewers will then consider the cover letter and revised paper and recommend final acceptance or rejection.

Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.

Important dates

Abstract Submissions: Sun 7 Jun 2015

Full Submissions: Sun 15 Jun 2015

First phase notification: Mon 27 Jul

Revisions due: Mon 3 Aug

Final notification: Mon 17 Aug

Camera ready: Fri 21 21 Aug

Program chair

Manuel Serrano, Inria Sophia-Antipolis,

dls15@easychair.org

Program committee

Carl Friedrich Bolz, DE

William R. Cook, UTexas, USA

Jonathan Edwards, MIT, USA

John Field, Google, USA

Matt Flatt, USA

Elisa Gonzalez Boix, Vrije Universiteit, BE

Robert Hirschfeld, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam, DE

Benjamin Livshits, Microsoft, USA

Crista Lopes, UC Irvine, USA

Kevin Millikin, Google, DN

James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ

Manuel Serrano, Inria, FR (General chair)

Didier Verna, EPITA, FR

Jan Vitek, Purdue, USA

Joe Politz, Brown University, USA

Olivier Tardieu, IBM, USA

Robert Hirschfeld

hirschfeld@acm.org

www.hirschfeld.org


by Ron Teitelbaum at May 20, 2015 10:32 PM